Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber
Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber (Sceliphron caementarium) like all sphecids are more closely related to bees than to the vespid wasps. They are solitary insects that build nests out of mud in sheltered locations, frequently on man-made structures. These nests are not aggressively defended, and stings are rare. Mud daubers make use of spiders to provision their cells. The black and yellow mud dauber’s nest is comprised of a series of cylindrical cells that are plastered over to form a smooth nest that may attain nearly the size of a human fist. After building a cell, the female wasp captures several spiders. The captured prey are stung and paralyzed before being placed in the nest, and then a single egg is deposited on the prey within each cell. The wasp then seals the cell with mud. After finishing a series of cells, she leaves and does not return. Eventually, the hatching larva will eat the prey and emerge from the nest. A common species of cuckoo wasp, Chrysis angolensis, is frequently a cleptoparasite in Sceliphron nests, and is only one of many different insects that parasitize these mud daubers.

EXIF info - Aperture : ƒ/9 | Camera : Canon EOS 40D | Taken : 25 June, 2008 | Flash fired : yes | Focal length : 100mm | ISO : 100 | Location : 13° 4′ 2.12844″ N 74° 59′ 44.3328″ E | Shutter speed : 1/250s | Images and content Copyright © Krishna Mohan. Please contact me to purchase prints or for image publication license.

7 thoughts on “Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

  1. Dear Forest Wander,
    Thanks for your wonderful comment, I wish to become like a professional. You have a vast collection of fantastic photographs at your site ForestWander Nature Photography. I was unable to find a place to leave comments over there. Glade creek Gristmill photograph was superb. You really have a heaven out there.
    Regards
    Krishna Mohan

  2. Thanks for dropping by and commenting on Black and Yellow Mud Dauber. I agree the highlight of the Grey granite nearer to the lens was distracting. I did not manipulate the photo, otherwise simple graduated filter using Adobe Lightroom would have masked that granite.
    Regards
    Krishna Mohan

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