Frame Within a Frame

Frame Within a Frame

Frame Within a Frame
Frame Within a Frame

If the frame is your window on the world, the composition is where you point it. The “Frame Within a Frame” basically pushes you to find boundaries within boundaries. In Angkor Wat, Cambodia I found this boy was shy and was trying to escape getting captured by me. So I jumped ahead and pre-focused the window which had a large void. I waited for him to arrive at the window, patiently. I knew due to curiosity he will peep out looking for me. I captured that second he glanced at me, next second he shied away and scooted from there. This blog is on “frame within a frame”

Obviously, the frame within a frame is much more interpretive than literal. Doorways, windows, and mirrors– elements with clearly defined lines – can create great effects. I enjoy seeing when photographers are comfortable enough to ignore the obvious and go for something much more organic.

First of all, a frame within a frame occurs when you use a visual element in the image to frame the primary subject. The purpose of using a frame within a frame is to help move the viewer’s eye toward that subject.

The beauty of incorporating a frame within the frame is that it can be virtually anything you want – a doorway or window, a cave or tunnel, or even foliage, clouds, or areas of light and shadow.

It’s interesting how many opportunities there are for framing the scenes around us, and yet they often go unnoticed. Maybe it’s a plain open window with a view of the mountains or the frame of the glasses that reveals interesting bug life on an old wooden table. Options and opportunities are limitless, and all around us. Grab your camera and look around in search for some “natural” frames.

EXIF info - Aperture : ƒ/9 | Camera : X-T2 | Taken : 14 October, 2016 | Focal length : 14mm | ISO : 2500 | Shutter speed : 1/250s | Images and content Copyright © Krishna Mohan. Please contact me to purchase prints or for image publication license.
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