Long-Jawed Orb Weaver - Tetragnatha spider

Long-Jawed Orb Weaver – Tetragnatha spider

Long-Jawed Orb Weaver - Tetragnatha spider
Long-Jawed Orb Weaver – Tetragnatha spider

My bathroom is haven for spiders. Huntsman spider, Cellar spiders (Pholcidae), Adanson’s House Jumper are all coexist with us. They also help rid my bathroom of pesky cockroaches, ants and mosquitoes. The Newest entree to my bathroom spider menagerie is a long-jawed orb-weaver Tetragnatha species. I was surprised to find this relatively common garden dwelling spider visiting my bathroom, seemingly as confused as I was, on finding itself on a vitrified tile surface, as opposed to a cosy cranny in my garden.

Since the spider was large, I used hand held stacking to get a wider depth of field. 9 photos were used to stack the first two images, presented here, for your viewing pleasure. (To learn more about photo stacking, you may refer to an earlier post – Focus Stacking Using Zerene Stacker). Virtually, the Same techniques and zerene stacker were also utilized for this endeavour. The last two images are single captures.

Longjawed orb weavers belong to the family Tetragnathidae. They were first described in 1804, by Pierre André Latreille and their name is derived from the Greek word tetra, meaning ‘four’ and gnathos, meaning ‘jaw. Many species possess extraordinarily elongated jaws and fangs, with the body being almost twig like, with long, stick like legs. The narrow shape, when combined with their resting posture, helps camouflage them, even if they are sitting right in the middle of their webs.

Long-Jawed Orb Weaver - Tetragnatha spider
Long-Jawed Orb Weaver – Tetragnatha spider

The spider family Tetragnathidae also includes two types of spiders that are closely related but look very different: the common Long-Jawed Orb Weavers, we discussed earlier and the Orchard Spiders.

Orchard Spiders also possess long fangs, but their bodies are not as elongated and skinny looking, as their long-jawed cousins. In fact, orchard spiders look awfully similar to the ‘true’ orb-spiders (family Araneidae), until you get a closer look at the long fangs and were, not too long ago, classified together in the same family.

Like true orb-weavers, long-jawed orb-weavers and orchard spiders build webs that resemble a circular grid, however, their webs usually do not possess as many radii, or “spokes,” as those of true orb weavers.

Long-jawed orb weavers construct orb webs in a horizontal plane, or close to it. This helps differentiate their webs from the vast majority of orb weavers that create webs on a vertical axis.

They are quite tolerant of their brethern, too, often building individual webs in close proximity to each other. This behavior reaches its zenith in Tetragnatha guatemalensis. The species is, for all means and purposes, essentially social, and capable of spinning communal webs that can stretch for acres.

Long-Jawed Orb Weaver - Tetragnatha spider
Long-Jawed Orb Weaver – Tetragnatha spider

Those species that spin their webs in meadows and glades, usually occupy the hub of their webs, but their long bodies, complemented by long legs held close to their bodies, when at rest, allow them to pass off as broken bits of grass and other debris. Additionally, many species are straw-colored, and seem to blend in quite well. When disturbed, they make a dash from their webs, hugging their bodies to grass stalks or twigs, blending in almost imperceptibly with the background

Water-loving species often prefer sit on the perimeter of their webs, once again resting close to the substrate, often a twig or piece of emergent vegetation that anchors one corner of their web. Their orbs usually have the spiral widely spaced, and yet the snare is equally effective in trapping aquatic insects such as midges, gnats, mosquitoes and mayflies that emerge directly from the water into the air, the horizontal web intercepting their flight, on the way up.

Adult tetragnathids, depending upon the species, can range from 5-16 mm or so, in body length, their long, spindly legs making them appear even longer.

Males are usually slightly smaller in length, as is the case with the vast majority of the Aranea (Spiders). During mating, both sexes grasp each other’s jaws. Males may have spurs on the chelicerae to receive the female’s fangs, presumably to avoid fatal results, from the whole affair.

Long-Jawed Orb Weaver - Tetragnatha spider
Long-Jawed Orb Weaver – Tetragnatha spider

Females deposit their eggs in silken egg sacs, which vary in appearance, depending upon species. Some are adhered closely to a twig or other such object, blending in with the substrate.

Identifying long-jawed orb weavers to species is an inexact science, based in large part on the structure of their genitalia; and also on the relative spacing of the eyes, and the length of the jaws relative to the length of the carapace (top of the cephalothorax).

That being said, long-jawed orb weavers certainly deserve our gratitude, for their role in helping diminish, the ever burgeoning populations of mosquitoes, midges, gnats and flies and other insect pests, plaguing humanity since centuries ago.

My greatest gratitude for helping out in editing this article goes to spider-man Javed Ahmed.

EXIF info - Aperture : ƒ/13 | Camera : Canon EOS 5D Mark III | Taken : 17 August, 2013 | Flash fired : no | Focal length : 100mm | ISO : 400 | Location : 13° 4.031′ 0″ N 74° 59.728′ 0″ E | Shutter speed : 1/60s | Images and content Copyright © Krishna Mohan. Please contact me to purchase prints or for image publication license.
EXIF info - Aperture : ƒ/13 | Camera : Canon EOS 5D Mark III | Taken : 17 August, 2013 | Flash fired : no | Focal length : 100mm | ISO : 400 | Location : 13° 4.031′ 0″ N 74° 59.728′ 0″ E | Shutter speed : 1/60s | Images and content Copyright © Krishna Mohan. Please contact me to purchase prints or for image publication license.
EXIF info - Aperture : ƒ/13 | Camera : Canon EOS 5D Mark III | Taken : 17 August, 2013 | Flash fired : no | Focal length : 100mm | ISO : 400 | Location : 13° 4.0311′ 0″ N 74° 59.7279′ 0″ E | Shutter speed : 1/60s | Images and content Copyright © Krishna Mohan. Please contact me to purchase prints or for image publication license.
EXIF info - Aperture : ƒ/13 | Camera : Canon EOS 5D Mark III | Taken : 17 August, 2013 | Flash fired : no | Focal length : 100mm | ISO : 400 | Location : 13° 4.0311′ 0″ N 74° 59.7279′ 0″ E | Shutter speed : 1/100s | Images and content Copyright © Krishna Mohan. Please contact me to purchase prints or for image publication license.

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